Four Books on the Decorative Arts

Luigi Valadier

By Alvar Gonzalez-Palacios

This is the catalogue for the forthcoming exhibition at the Frick on Roman designer Luigi Valadier (1726-1785), whose luxurious furniture and ornaments furnished the palaces of the Papacy and aristocracy across eighteenth-century Europe. Famed for the elaborate elegance of his centrepieces in marble, gold, hard stone, and gilt bronze, he was also a gifted draftsman.

Fifty objects by Valadier and his workshop are featured in this catalogue, with full descriptions. Many are illustrated in parallel with the artist’s drawn designs. The volume also explores the exact provenance, dating, and attributions of the pieces within the Valadier family, with Luigi’s father Andrea and son Giuseppe often collaborating with each other, as well as with other workshops.

Exhibition dates: 31st of October 2018 to the 20th of January 2019.

560 pages with 368 colour illustrations.

Hardback.

30.5 x 23cms.

£79.95

 

Giacomo Raffaelli (1753-1836). Maestro di stile e di mosaico (master of style and mosaics)

By Massimo Alfieri, Laura Biancini, Tassinari Gabriella, and E. Andreevna Yakovleva

This volume examines the whole of Giacomo Rafaelli’s known oeuvre. The Roman micro-mosaicist catered to a clientele of Grand Tourists, producing exquisite plates, tables, and jewellery for the aristocracy on their alpine travels. Attracted by his prestige, the Napoleonic government commissioned him to found a mosaic school in Milan and to create his most famous piece: a replica of Leonardo da Vinci’s last supper.

With comprehensive catalogue descriptions, the book is illustrated with a wide range of mosaics and stone works belonging to museums and private collections in Europe and the United States.

376 pages with 400 colour and several black and white illustrations.

Hardback.

24.5 x 31cms.

Text in Italian

£130.00

 

Pelagio Pelagi Decorateur des Palais Royaux de Turin et du Piémont (1832-1856)

By Betrand Royere

A retracing of Pelagio Pelagi’s decoration of the Royal Palace of Turin and the castles of Racconigi and Pollenzo, amongst others. The artist was commissioned upon the accession of Charles Albert to the throne of Piedmont-Sardinia, in the hope that they might mimic the stylishness of French design whilst employing an Italian artisan. Famed as an arbiter of taste, his style ranged from the neoclassical to the eclectic, and who incorporated the latest archaeological discoveries of Etruscan art into the highest royal fashions.

The book focuses in detail on the lavish wall decorations, furniture, bronzes, paintings and sculptures. It draws from the rich archives of Turin and Bologna to give full catalogue descriptions of each piece, with illustrations of the drawn designs by this painter-architect-decorator.

400 pages, 269 illustrations.

Hardback.

26 x 31cms.

Text in French

£65.00

 

Paris Furniture, the luxury market of the 19th century.

By Christopher Payne.

This publication offers a comprehensive survey of over one hundred Paris-based furniture makers who, during the 19th-Century, produced luxury furniture for international aristocrats, bankers, and newly wealthy industrialists. Among the featured craftsmen are Sormani, Bagues, Barbedienne, Christofle, Lievre, Viardot, Dasson, Grohe, Sauvrezy, Fourdinois, Beurdeley and Linke.

Detailed information is given on production dates, furniture styles, identification marks, exhibitions, and patrons of this period in which Paris, despite the century’s tumultuous beginnings, was once again the centre of the world for sumptuous comfort and experimental design.

608 pages with about 1,500 illustrations.

Hardback.

24 x 28cms.

£165.00

 

For details and orders:

Email: artbooks@heneage.com

Telephone: 020 7930 9223

 

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